Tag Archives: cats

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital Weighs In On Pet Obesity

Pet obesity can be difficult to talk about –but avoiding the issue isn’t helping. Come on out and see a KAH veterinarian so we can start helping your furry friend.

What is the most common health problem our veterinarians see at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital? Easy guesses might be kidney disease, or oral disease, so the answer might be surprising: it’s obesity. Chances are, everyone knows someone with a chubby dog or a fat cat. This is because America’s furry friends have a big problem: pet obesity rates are at an all-time high. In 2018, 56% of dogs and 60% of cats were overweight. Obese pets are at significantly increased risk for joint disease such as osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia, as well as overall health problems such as type II diabetes and hepatic lipidosis (fatty liver disease).

KAH assistant Aaron and technician Robin showcase  body condition scoring systems. Ask a KAH veterinarian for a copy at your pet’s next visit!

How exactly is pet obesity defined? Here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, our veterinarians use the Purina Body Condition System to assess a pet’s weight. Each pet is assigned a score from 1 to 9, with a 4-to-5 as the “ideal” weight. At a 5 on the scale, pets have a defined, easily visible waist as well as an obvious abdominal tuck. A 6 or a 7 is an overweight animal, with 8s and 9s qualifying as obese. An easy way to check if a pet is at a good weight is to feel along the animal’s rib cage. The ribs should be felt in the same way as the bones across the back of a human hand. If they are more prominent, the pet is underweight, but if they can only be felt by pressing hard or can’t be felt at all, the pet is overweight.

Once a pet has reached overweight or obese status, what is the best way to help him or her lose the weight?  This depends on a lot of factors, such as: the animal’s age and normal activity level; whether it is a dog, a cat, or a rabbit; and what the pet’s current diet is. The veterinarians at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital work closely with pet owners to create a custom weight loss plan based on all of these factors. Sometimes it is as simple as cutting each meal back by 20%, or switching to a

KAH assistant Kayla is checking pooch Bruce’s weight. KAH staffers will happily conduct free weight checks for any pet–call today to schedule a tech appointment!

weight-management diet. Pets on grain-free diets are more likely to pack on the weight since grain-free diets are usually more calorically dense (have more calories per cup) than diets that contain grains, so a switch to a different food altogether may help Fluffy or Rover slim down.  For obese pets in need of a rigorous diet plan, KAH veterinarians sometimes recommend Hill’s Metabolic Diet, a prescription-only food that is formulated specifically to help pets feel full while increasing their metabolism.  Each dog or cat started on Metabolic is measured to determine their target weight and given a weight loss-over-time plan.  This is because It is dangerous for animals, especially cats, to lose weight too quickly! Rapid weight loss, whether it is intended or not, is a sign that a pet needs to see a veterinarian.

KAH patient Piper has lost almost 30 pounds this year! Check out her weight chart, displayed by KAH technician Katie.

Perhaps the most compelling argument to get the pounds off the pooch is a recent study from the University of Liverpool in England. Researchers found that dogs who were overweight live an average of two-and-a-half less years than dogs who were a healthy weight. All of us want as many years as possible with our fur-babies, and we want them to be good, healthy years, right? Please make an appointment with a veterinarian at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital so that we can help with any weight-loss woes!

When You’re Back From Vacation—Get Your Pet Vaccinations (At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital)!

One of the major reasons pet owners bring their fur-babies to the vet is for “routine shots.”  More and more often there are stories on the news about “overvaccination” or disease

KAH technician Nora is showcasing all of the canine vaccine options!

outbreaks. It can be difficult to determine what is best for a beloved pet—to vaccinate, or not to vaccinate? Fortunately, Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick MD is here to weigh in on this important topic: what are vaccines, which ones are available, and which are best for a pet?

Vaccines are substances that stimulate an immune response to

KAH technician Tiki is displaying our cat vaccines!

bacteria or a virus in a pet or person. They do this by tricking the immune system into thinking that the human or animal who received the vaccine has been infected. The immune system prepares a response to that bacteria or virus, and then saves that information in case of “reinfection.” If the immune system is already familiar with an infection, it responds quickly and strongly. This is how vaccinated pets/people are able to fight off things like the flu so much better than those who are not vaccinated. Think of it like knowing there is a pop quiz coming—the immune system is “studying” when it is vaccinated, so it will perform much better on the test than one that is unprepared.

  • Rabies is a zoonotic (will spread to people) virus that causes neurologic complications in affected animals, and it is fatal. For these reasons, rabies vaccination is required by law, even for pets who don’t go outside often. This is because a pet who slips out the door can easily encounter an infected animal—or an infected bat can quickly fly into a home. Rabies vaccines are available for dogs, cats, ferrets, horses, and several other species. Rabies is a

    KAH veterinarian Dr Lynch is giving this kitty a rabies vaccine. Pet vaccines go under the skin, not into the muscle like people vaccines.

    core vaccine.

  • Distemper is the name given to a virus that attacks the respiratory system. For dogs, the distemper vaccine is often combined with parvovirus and adenovirus vaccines (DAP), and for cats it is combined with calicivirus and panleukopenia (FVRCP). All of these viruses are most likely to attack very young or more elderly pets, but they are very easily spread between members of the same species and can quickly cause an outbreak. Distemper is a core vaccine.
  • Leptospiriosis, or “lepto,” is a type of bacteria that attacks the kidneys, nervous system, and liver. Like rabies, it is both zoonotic and fatal. It is spread through the urine of infected animals; in rural areas/suburbs, it is most often found in deer, squirrels, moles, skunks and rabbits, while in more urban areas rodents like mice and rats are the major carriers. Here in Frederick, Lepto is a core vaccine

    KAH veterinarian Dr Walker is giving a distemper vaccine. Please ask a KAH staff member how we can make the vaccine experience FearFree for your pet!

    since we have several documented cases.

  • Lyme is a bacteria that is spread by ticks. It can affect people and dogs but cannot be spread from one to the other without tick involvement—this means that ticks are vectors for Lyme disease. Here in Frederick, the Lyme vaccine is a lifestyle vaccine, because not all dogs may be at risk for Lyme. Those that are not at risk are indoor-only dogs who are current year-round on flea and tick preventative. Remember—only a week-long temperature of -10°F will kill ticks during the winter, otherwise they are just looking even harder for a warm body!
  • Bordetella is better known as “kennel cough.” It spreads very quickly from dog to dog and causes a slight fever along with its hallmark hacking cough. Environments with lots of dogs in tight

    This sweet pup is receiving a vaccine with the help of 2 KAH technicians. If your dog does better for vaccines with you present — speak up!

    quarters, such as day cares and grooming facilities, are where most infections are likely to occur—so this vaccine is a lifestyle vaccine recommended for dogs who board, groom, or go to dog parks or day care.

  • Feline Leukemia, or FeLV, is a virus that is spread from cat to cat via saliva and causes symptoms very similar to leukemia in humans. Also a lifestyle vaccine, FeLV is reccomended only for cats who go outdoors or interact with other cats who do.

That is a lot of information! It’s easy to become overwhelmed with all of the options out there. Please talk to your veterinarian at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital with any questions or concerns.

Firework Fear: Tips On Independence Day Safety From Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

It’s almost that time of year again–the days are long and warm, neighbors are out grilling, and

KAH veterinarian Dr Kemper poses with a patrioic patient!

everyone is gearing up for the celebration of our nation’s independence. Cookouts and picnics inevitably lead up to a big, colorful fireworks display on July 4th… which is so much fun for humans, but can be terrifying for our dogs and cats.

The loud bangs accompanying fireworks sound 4-6 times louder to our canine friends, and up to 8 times louder to cats.  Couple this with changes in routine, new people, and lots of new food/smells… it’s no wonder that the highest percentage of pets go missing around the

KAH CSR Kelly has prepped her pup Sugar for the upcoming fireworks!

Fourth of July.

The very best way to help fur babies with fireworks is counter-conditioning.  This is a series of exercises done at home that gradually acclimate pets to the loud sounds made by fireworks. While this does take some time and some patience, it is definitely the safest way to get dogs or cats through loud noises.  Some in-depth information about counter-conditioning for fireworks (or thunderstorms!) can be found by clicking here.

Fortunately, there are lots of short-term things we can do to help our furry friends get through this holiday in one piece! Below are some recommendaions from Kingsbrook Animal Hospital‘s top-noch veterinarians:

  1.  Leave pets at home, and if possible remain at home with them. This is also a great

    KAH patient Jada is modeling a thundershirt and listening to an iCalmdog. Both of these fear-free methods are used often here at KAH with our patients who spend the day with us.

    opportunity to check the fit of each pet’s collar, verify contact information on collar tags, and make sure all pets are microchipped jus in case the unthinkable happens.

  2. Consider crating pets or confining them to a small, quiet area with a minimum of traffic. Terrified pets will try to bolt, so keeping them away from doors to the outside is key to preventing escapes.
  3.  Provide background noise, such as the television or radio, to help drown out the sounds. For a fear-free approved and portable option, check out the iCalmDog (or iCalmCat).
  4.  Also consider adding pheremone support for anxiety-prone pets. A great option for cats is the Feliway diffuser, and for dogs try Adaptil–either the collar or the diffuser are good choices.
  5. Thundershirts can help to calm an anxious dog or cat. These snug-fitting, adjustable jackets provide a lot of comfort and are infinitely reusable.
  6. Talk to a Kingsbrook Animal Hospital veterinarian about options for medications. There are several new choices that are great for situational anxiety!

For more information, please see the AVMA’s resource on July 4th Safety and the article on Fireworks Fear from the Fear Free organization.

 

 

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital Celebrates National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week

Kingsbrook CSR Nina quickly poses for a photo before delivering Howl-O-Ween goodies to our friends at Frederick County Animal Control.

There is no better gift to a homeless animal than giving them a second chance at life!  Shelters and rescues across the country work tirelessly to provide animals in need a safe place to sleep, Kingsbrook CSR Nina quickly poses for a photo before delivering some Howl-O-Ween goodies to our friends at FCAC to eat, provide veterinary care and ultimately find their fur-ever home.  According to the Humane Society of the United States, “approximately 3,500 animal shelters across the United States serve the estimated 6-8 million homeless animals who need refuge each year.”

In celebration of National Animal Shelter and Rescue Appreciation Week, we at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, MD, invite everyone to take some extra time this week to show

FCAC has many adorable dogs and cats available for adoption!

your local animal shelter or rescue some love.  A good place to start is Frederick County Animal Control, our local animal shelter.  FCAC is always in need of the help of volunteers and their time.  For anyone who is unable to volunteer but would still like to donate supplies, it’s easy to call and find out what FCAC needs! Monetary donations are always appreciated, as well as food, toys, and bedding…and it’s also possible to give a token of gratitude for the volunteers and employees by dropping off some human treats (like Nina did!) or some recognition on social media.  For FCAC’s contact information, click here.

Fortunately for the abundance of animals, there are other rescues and shelters in the Frederick area. These organizations not only work to help homeless animals within their community, they also help save lives during natural disasters.  This past September

Kingsbrook CSR Tiffany meets Frank, one of the Beagle Bed & Breakfast rescue dogs.

during Hurricane Florence, countless animals from the Carolinas were in dire need of aid.  Many of the shelters in the affected area needed to be evacuated, and sadly, many animals are humanely euthanized in these events.  Two local Frederick rescues, City Dogs Rescue and Capitol Canines interceded to clear the Carolina shelters and save many dogs from being euthanized.  Both rescues contacted Megan Purtell, owner of the Beagle Bed & Breakfast and foster mom. In less than a month, Megan took in about 20 dogs that were transported from the Carolinas.  Thankfully, many were quickly adopted and lots of folks were able to donate supplies and their time by feeding and walking the dogs, cleaning kennels, and organizing donated food and supplies. Since Megan is a longtime client at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, some of our staff members were fortunate enough to meet a few of these special dogs.

Kingsbrook veterinarian says hello to Chance, a City Dogs rescue pup from North Carolina.

While natural disasters do not happen frequently, every day there are more and more animals and rescues that need our help.  This year, consider adopting or fostering a homeless animal.  Empower yourself through social media to connect and share information with your friends and family about your favorite shelters or animals!  There is never too little or too much we can do to show our local shelters and rescues that we care and support them.

Getting To The Heart Of The Issue: KAH Talks About Feline Heart Disease

Cats are very resilient creatures, but they are still prone to certain health issues…one of the most common being heart disease. There are multiple types of heart disease, and as a cat-mom or cat-dad it can be devastating to learn that a beloved feline has such a serious health issue. Fortunately, the veterinary community has learned a lot about this problem over the past few years, and it continues to be a major focus of study. There are even

Dr. Lynch’s own kitty, Cricket, had heart issues, so this is a topic near and dear to her…heart. 🙂

dedicated pet cardiologists—we are lucky enough to have an office right here in Frederick!

To learn more about feline heart disease, we sat down with Dr. Jenny Lynch, one of Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s amazing veterinarians. Keep reading for some answers to the most commonly asked questions about heart disease in cats!

  1. What causes heart disease in cats? Is there anything that can prevent it?
    Dr. JL: Heart disease in cats can be caused by a taurine deficiency; lack of this amino acid can cause eye problems as well, so it is important to feed a diet with plenty of taurine in it! There are also certain breeds of cats that are genetically predisposed to heart disease, such as Maine Coons and other “fancy” cats.
  2. The veterinarian heard a heart murmur during my cat’s physical exam. What does this mean?
    Dr. JL: It could mean a lot of different things.  A heart murmur means that there is increased turbulence of blood flow through the heart.  This can sometimes be caused by anemia (a low red blood cell count) or by a systemic issue like hyperthyroidism or hypertension. Even a very high heart rate can cause a murmur. But sometimes a heart murmur is the first indication of heart disease.  It is very important to follow up on a heart murmur, because untreated heart disease causes blindness, congestive heart failure, blood clots that may lead to stroke or paralysis, collapse, and eventually loss of the pet’s life.
  3. What is the next step if my cat is diagnosed with a heart problem?

    Finding out a pet has heart disease can be scary. The caring staff at KAH is here to help!

    Dr. JL: The next step is to determine the cause of the heart murmur.  Visit the cardiologist for an echocardiogram, which is an ultrasound of the heart. The cardiologist will measure the heart muscle and look at each of the valves of the heart to find the source of the murmur. Bloodwork can help to rule out anemia and hyperthyroidism, and there is even a special blood test that can be done to measure heart muscle damage.
    4. My kitty acts completely fine at home. How can I tell if s/he has heart disease?
    Dr. JL: Unfortunately, cats tend not to show symptoms of heart disease. The best thing to do is bring cats for regular check-ups at the vet; annually until they are 7 or 8 years old, then

    Monitoring cats for signs of heart disease starts at their first visit! Dr Kemper says little Molly’s heart sounds great.

    twice a year so we can stay on top of any potential issues. Early detection and intervention can slow the progression of heart disease and will add a few more quality years to a kitty’s life.
    5. Where can I find more information about this issue?
    Visit the CVCA website, or the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) website–and any of our veterinarians here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital are happy to answer any questions!

Brushing Up On Oral Home Care: An Interview With Dr. Walker

One topic we are very passionate about here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital is pet oral health!  Pets are living longer, happier lives than ever before, so maintaining good oral hygiene is just as important for them as it is for humans.
Most pet owners are great at recognizing when their dog’s or cat’s teeth need a professional

KAH veterinarian Dr. Walker loves to help animals have healthy mouths!

cleaning, and it’s important to make an annual cleaning part of every pet’s health care routine. But before and in between cleanings, there is a lot that pet parents can do at home to keep their fur babies’ mouths healthy. For some trusted veterinary advice, we turned to Dr. Jennifer Walker, one of our veterinarians here at Kingsbrook!

  1. So why is caring for my pet’s teeth at home so important?

Dr. W: For many reasons! Oral health affects every organ in the body, and disease can be hidden. Preventing that disease is our goal.

2. What is the best thing I can do to keep my puppy or kitten’s teeth healthy?

KAH is super-dedicated to pet oral health! We met with Dr. Cindy Charlier (4th from left), a veterinary dental specialist, for 3 days of continuing education.

Dr. W: Brushing is best, but there are lots of options. We tailor an oral home care plan to each pet by working with our clients. If you aren’t ready for brushing just yet, there are wipes, rinses, and even a tartar control diet that serve as great starting points.

3. My older cat or dog doesn’t like having his mouth handled, but I am interested in starting an oral home care routine. What can I do?

Dr. W: Each pet is different, so we recommend talking with your veterinarian. I’ve had success with some pets by introducing the toothpaste on a favorite treat.

4. Between our pets, my job, and the kids, I am so busy lately and I don’t have a lot of room in my schedule to add another commitment. Is there anything I can do that is faster, or that takes less time?

Dr. W: I completely understand! Oral home care didn’t used to be part of my routine either. I have 2 kids, 3 dogs, 2 cats, and a full-time job. However, I was challenged to try for one month and I was surprised at how it worked out. My normal routine is to wake up, feed my dog, and start my coffee. So I decided to start while my coffee was brewing but kept forgetting to do it. I put the toothbrush and toothpaste in his food cup as a visual reminder when I went to feed him.  I started by just letting my dog lick toothpaste in his food bowl, and over time worked up from there. Now it takes me about 30 seconds to brush his teeth all while I’m waiting for my morning coffee.  A completely different routine may work better for you. One of our CSRs put her dog’s toothbrush in the bathroom right next to her own toothbrush, so she remembers to brush every night.  If your kids are old enough, you can even make it their job to brush—you can help teach responsibility and keep your pet healthy.

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s “Joint” Talks: A Discussion About Arthritis

When the weather turns wintry, every pet has a different reaction!
Some pets love the cold and snow, while others  prefer to cuddle up by the fire. Furry friends who seem stiff or uncomfortable may be experiencing symptoms of arthritis. We sat down with Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s own Dr. Riley to get more information on this important issue!

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital veterinarian Dr. Riley was glad to chat about arthritis.

 

  1. So, we know that arthritis affects our pets’ joints. What exactly is arthritis, and how does it happen?
    Dr. R: “Arthritis is caused by the body’s response to instability or inflammation in a joint. It can erode cartilage, which acts like a cushion in a healthy joint to keep bones from rubbing together, and form irregular surfaces inside the joint. Conditions like hip dysplasia, a ligament rupture, or a loose kneecap (luxating patella) can lead to arthritis.”
  2. How do I know if my pet has arthritis?

KAH veterinarian Dr. Walker’s rescue kitty Smokey Joe suffers from arthritis in his joints.

Dr. R:  “Pets who have arthritis will start to show changes in their habits. They may lose interest in activities they used to enjoy, like playing with a toy or chasing squirrels.
Often, we notice dogs limping, or cats who can’t groom themselves as well. Many pets who have arthritis begin to lose muscle around the affected joint. Arthritic pets may be slow to get up or lie down, and they can have trouble getting comfortable.”

Even guinea pigs can have arthritis! KAH technician Sam poses with Hawke, who is on daily NSAIDs to help with joint pain.

3. What can I do to help my pet stay comfortable if s/he has arthritis?
Dr. R: “The best thing we can do for our animals is to seek treatment before the problem becomes severe. Intervening early means we have a better chance of slowing down arthritis or preventing additional complications. A joint supplement, like Dasuquin, with proven ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin, and MSM is an easy way to help pets who suffer from arthritis. Many animals also do well with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drugs.”

4. I worry about using a lot of medications for my pets. Are there options to treat arthritis that don’t involve drugs?

Dr. R: “Yes, there are! Even pets who don’t have joint pain can benefit from a fish oil/fatty acid supplement, but it is great for joint health. There are prescription diets, like Hills™ j/d and Royal Canin™ Mobility Support, that can help with arthritis symptoms. Physical therapy, or even consistent regular exercise (with a veterinarian’s approval) can help to keep joints moving and decrease stiffness. And there are some great alternative therapies available, too—laser therapy and acupuncture help a lot of pets stay comfortable and happy.”

KAH technicians Lainey and Julie pose with Rocket. Dachshunds are a dog breed prone to arthritis.

All of the veterinarians here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, MD, are excited to help pets who are suffering from arthritis, and the entire staff is happy to answer any questions about symptoms or treatment options!

 

 

A Journey Is Best Measured in (Furry) Friends: Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s Brief History of Pets

November is Pet Pilgrimage Month at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, MD! We decided to take the suggestion literally and explore the history of pets.

Early dogs were indispensable to their owners, helping to hunt and fish.

The scientific community agrees that dogs were the first domesticated animals. Early humans developed mutually beneficial relationships with dogs; they were better at hunting and guarding, and humans provided a steady supply of food, warmth, and shelter.
Evidence of dogs living and working alongside humans can be found dating all the way back to almost 10,000 BC. Romans and Eqyptians around 3500 BC had dogs painted or carved alongside their nobles and families.

It’s easy to see how such beautiful, regal creatures were once regarded as deities!

Many experts believe that feral cats were introduced into villages by It’s easyGreek and Phoenician traders, where their presence was accepted and gradually welcomed because of their hunting ability. Over time, these cats began to be invited into villagers’ homes and were bred for temperament along with hunting skill. The Japanese, Norse, and Egyptians worshiped cats and believed they were divine beings.

Over the centuries that followed, animals began to be seen as status symbols. Chinese Emperor Ling Ti appointed his dogs senior court officials in AD180, and by the year 800 many wealthy households in Europe and Asia had at least one pet. Kings and queens had favorite

Dogs now enjoy a wide range of comforts from their owners!

furry friends, and explorers visiting new continents or countries would often bring a pet with them (or bring a new pet home). In the 1800s, birds were the most popular pets because they could sing and entertain. By the mid-1900s more “exotic” animals like reptiles and guinea pigs had started to become pets. Pet rabbits took off in

While some cats still hunt for mice, most like to remind their owners of the days when cats were worshiped…

popularity after the early 1970 release of Watership Down.

Today, over 56% of American households have at least one pet, and our pets are considered family members, not just animals. Some “fur babies” have their own social media pages, their own rooms in the home…some celebrity pets even have personal chefs! Pets have come a long way from their origins. Humans wouldn’t be where we are without them, and pet parents everywhere agree that we wouldn’t want to be, either.

Hot Topic: Pet Fire Safety Tips From Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

According to data analysis by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), almost 1,000 house fires every year are accidentally started by pets. National Pet Fire Safety Day is on July 14th, so the veterinarians at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick MD have shared some fire prevention tips!

  1. Be careful with open flames. Many pets are curious and will likely investigate candles or fireplaces. NEVER leave pets unattended around an open flame.
  2. Invest in flameless candles. A wagging tail can easily knock over a lit candle, leading to fires. Flameless candles use a flickering light bulb instead, and many are LED-based–which almost completely negates a fire hazard.
  3. Purchase stove knob covers. The NFPA says that a stove or a cook top is most likely to be involved when pets start fires.
  4. Beware of glass water bowls on wooden decks. Sun rays are refracted through the water and glass, heating both elements. This can heat up and ignite the wooden deck.
  5. Secure cords and hide them behind furniture. Some dogs and cats see cords as chew toys, and damaged cords can cause electrocution and/or fires.

Fires are scary for everyone involved, and prevention is key! Take advantage of Pet Fire Safety Day to ensure a safe, fire-proof home. Keep checking Kingsbrook Animal Hospital‘s Facebook page during the month of July for more pet fire safety tips.

Incredible (Pet) Insurance Information From Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

Veterinary medicine is constantly advancing both in scope and in quality, and one newer option many pet owners aren’t familiar with is pet insurance. At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, this is a topic most often brought up in conversations with new puppy or kitten owners, but animals of all ages can benefit from a pet insurance plan. Below, KAH shares some information on pet insurance to help owners make an informed decision!
1. Pet insurance plans are usually for accident/illness, but many offer additional coverage for wellness care. This can help to cover things like routine vaccinations, annual (or semi-annual) physical exams, and even oral health care such as dental cleanings. Some companies even offer additional riders for breeding dogs or those who are at increased risk of hip dysplasia.
2. Most plans are customizable in cost, where owners can set their own premiums and/or deductibles. A higher deductible amount usually means a lower monthly or quarterly premium, just like with human insurance.
3. Pet insurance covers new problems, but not pre-existing conditions. For example, if a dog has been treated for an ear infection previously and comes in for a new exam because he is shaking his head and scratching at his ears, pet insurance will not cover the new exam or any treatments if the problem this time is another ear infection. This is why Kingsbrook Animal Hospital discusses pet insurance plans with all new pets–if they’re enrolled while they’re young and healthy, there are no pre-existing conditions!
4. Different than human health insurance, with its co-pays and delayed billing, pet insurance reimburses owners once claim forms and invoices have been submitted. Owners still have to pay for exams and treatments out-of-pocket, but once the insurance company processes the claim a check will be mailed for the amount covered.
5. Not all pet insurance is created equal. Kingsbrook Animal Hospital recommends Pets Best insurance (click on the link to learn more), but several other companies such as Trupanion and Embrace have gotten good reviews from our clients too.

KAH patient Swaggy is ready to look into pet insurance! Be sure to research which company has the best plan for each pet before buying!

 
6. Keep in mind that most insurance companies have a “waiting period” after enrollment, usually between 10-30 days. This means that any exams or issues within 10-30 days after applying for coverage will not be picked up by the new insurance.