Tag Archives: Frederick

Incredible (Pet) Insurance Information From Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

Veterinary medicine is constantly advancing both in scope and in quality, and one newer option many pet owners aren’t familiar with is pet insurance. At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, this is a topic most often brought up in conversations with new puppy or kitten owners, but animals of all ages can benefit from a pet insurance plan. Below, KAH shares some information on pet insurance to help owners make an informed decision!
1. Pet insurance plans are usually for accident/illness, but many offer additional coverage for wellness care. This can help to cover things like routine vaccinations, annual (or semi-annual) physical exams, and even oral health care such as dental cleanings. Some companies even offer additional riders for breeding dogs or those who are at increased risk of hip dysplasia.
2. Most plans are customizable in cost, where owners can set their own premiums and/or deductibles. A higher deductible amount usually means a lower monthly or quarterly premium, just like with human insurance.
3. Pet insurance covers new problems, but not pre-existing conditions. For example, if a dog has been treated for an ear infection previously and comes in for a new exam because he is shaking his head and scratching at his ears, pet insurance will not cover the new exam or any treatments if the problem this time is another ear infection. This is why Kingsbrook Animal Hospital discusses pet insurance plans with all new pets–if they’re enrolled while they’re young and healthy, there are no pre-existing conditions!
4. Different than human health insurance, with its co-pays and delayed billing, pet insurance reimburses owners once claim forms and invoices have been submitted. Owners still have to pay for exams and treatments out-of-pocket, but once the insurance company processes the claim a check will be mailed for the amount covered.
5. Not all pet insurance is created equal. Kingsbrook Animal Hospital recommends Pets Best insurance (click on the link to learn more), but several other companies such as Trupanion and Embrace have gotten good reviews from our clients too.

KAH patient Swaggy is ready to look into pet insurance! Be sure to research which company has the best plan for each pet before buying!

 
6. Keep in mind that most insurance companies have a “waiting period” after enrollment, usually between 10-30 days. This means that any exams or issues within 10-30 days after applying for coverage will not be picked up by the new insurance.

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s Top 4 Tips on Pet Oral Home Care

One common topic encountered during examinations at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital is caring for pets’ teeth at home.  This can seem like a daunting task, and owners often have questions about where to begin and what options there are for oral home care. The following are KAH’s Top Four Tips on Oral Home Care for pets!

 

  1. Start early—begin handling a puppy or kitten’s mouth as early as possible. Introduce toothpaste and the toothbrush slowly to get pets used to the idea. For older pets, start by letting them lick some toothpaste off a finger and gradually introduce the toothbrush.
  2. Start out slowly with introducing toothpaste and a toothbrush. Even cats can learn to accept brushing!

    Make it positive—offer a favorite treat or even a meal after brushing to build up acceptance and create positive experiences. Dental treats (see #4) are a great option for this!

  3. Brush often—once a day is ideal, but at least 3 times a week will make a difference in the buildup of plaque and tartar. Check out our YouTube channel for a video with a demonstration on how to brush teeth!
  4. Consider nonbrushing options such as Hills t/d or dental treats (Greenies for cats, OraVet

    KAH technician Nora applies OraVet sealant to patient Xanthos’s teeth after his cleaning!

    Chews for dogs) for pets who aren’t as accepting of brushing. There are also dental wipes and water additives. Kingsbrook Animal Hospital recommends using only products endorsed by the VOHC (Veterinary Oral Health Council), an independent third-party organization that tests all pet dental products on the market.

  5. Choose a professional sealant to be applied after a professional cleaning. KAH offers OraVet and Sanos sealants, which help slow the buildup of plaque and tartar and extend the efficacy of a cleaning. Ask a Kingsbrook veterinarian for more information!

 

Laser Therapy at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

Veterinary medicine is a field that’s constantly changing and evolving; there are new medicines and treatments available for our pets almost every day. Here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, one advance that we were quick to embrace was a therapy laser.

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Veterinary Assistants Rush and Abby perform laser therapy on Penelope’s surgical incision

Laser therapy uses specific wavelengths of light to treat pain. The therapy laser has a handpiece that directs the light and focuses it on the area that’s being treated. Laser therapy can be used for almost any kind of pain—a veterinarian may prescribe laser therapy for chronic joint pain (such as arthritis or hip dysplasia), for post-surgical pain (like a cruciate repair), or for wound care. It can even be used on gum tissue after oral surgery, or to treat pain associated with ear infections! New uses for laser therapy are being discovered all the time.

 

One of the best things about laser therapy is that it’s a non-invasive, easy way to treat our furry friends. Treatments are usually very quick (anywhere from 3-5 minutes total) and can be accompanied by lots of petting and treats. It can be used in conjunction with many medications and is painless as well as stress-free. At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, therapy is usually started with three treatments the first week, two treatments the second week, and one last treatment in week three before the veterinarian assesses how the laser therapy is helping.

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Veterinary Assistant Heather takes a moment to pose with Priscilla before starting treatment

Only a few veterinarians in Frederick have a therapy laser, but the number is growing. Is laser therapy right for your animal companion? Ask your veterinarian, at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, to find out more about this great new option for treating pain in pets!

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Veterinary Technician Sam cuddles Gideon during his laser therapy!

Crafting with KAH: Make your own doggie ‘Potty Bell’ in Frederick, MD

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s DIY “Potty Bell” for dogs!

Even if you don’t live in Frederick, MD- this is a great idea to help with training your dog!

Materials needed:

Ribbon

Bells

‘D’ ring (or key ring)

Scissors

Lighter

Hot glue gun

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Step 1. Tie a loop around your doorknob and “measure” how big the loop needs to be and how long.

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Step 2. Cut the ribbon a little longer than the desired length (this gives you room to tie on the bells later).

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Step 3. Singe the end of your ribbon with a lighter to prevent fraying.
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Step 4. Slide the bells onto the D-ring or Key ring.

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Step 5. Tie the end of the ribbon (opposite side of doorknob loop) onto the D-ring or Key-ring.

 

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Step 6. Tie a bow onto the unfinished knots, cut and singe ends.

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Step 7. Re-enforce the bow by placing a small amount of hot glue under the bow’s knot.

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Step 8. Tie a bow to loop around door knob.

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Step 9: Hang on your door and introduce to your pup!

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*For tips on how to teach your dog to use the ‘Potty Bell,’ call us at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital 301-631-6900.

Remember- we love to see your final projects! Share your pictures with your favorite veterinarian- Kingsbrook Animal Hospital!

 

Crafting with KAH: Make a Paw Print Picture Frame in Frederick, MD

                Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s DYI Paw print picture frame for dogs or cats!

11-final projectSupplies…

Wooden frame

Paint brush

2 different colors of paint

paint pen

dog

01-Supplies


Step 1…

Paint the wooden frame with one of your chosen colors & wait for the the first coat to dry. Repeat if necessary.

03-Step 104-Step 1 finishedStep 2…

Paint your dogs paw pads ( I decided to do this outside )

05-Step 2 ( another step 2)Step 3…

Stop! selfie time!

06-Step 3 Sugar selfieStep 4…

Place your dogs paw print on the frame itself.

Hint- lift your dog’s paw slowly so not to smear the paw print.

(Remember to wash the paint from your dog’s paw once this step is complete.)

08-Step 4

09-paw print step 4Step 5…

Use the paint pen to write your dog’s name on the frame above the paw print.

10-Step 5Step 6…

Place a picture of your of dog in your frame & enjoy!

12-Sugar with pawprint frame








Kingsbrook Animal Hospital approved Dog Biscuit Recipe!

Homemade Dog Biscuits


Ingredients:Untitled

2 tablespoons plain applesauce

1/2 cup peanut butter

1 egg

1 cup whole wheat flour

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1 cup rolled oats

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.


Mix applesauce, peanut butter, and egg together. Once combined, add flour, baking powder and oats.

IMG_7764Place dough onto a flour-dusted workspace and using a rolling pin, roll out the dough until it is about 1/4 inch thick. Using a cookie cutter, cut out treats and place on a baking sheet.

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Bake for 15-20 minutes until edges are golden brown.

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Remove from oven. Cool on pan for 10 minutes then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely.


Store in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.

RVTs Samantha and Lainey with a fresh batch!

RVTs Samantha and Lainey with a fresh batch!

Click HERE to see the Kingsbrook crew using this recipe!


Crafting with KAH: Build your own cat hideout in Frederick, MD

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s DIY Cat Hideout!

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Indoor cats benefit greatly from enrichment items, especially cat hideouts! It gives them an acceptable area to stretch their claws and provides a hiding spot for napping and/or playing. Kingsbrook RVT, Julie, has 2 cats and here is a picture of one of their well used cat hideouts. As you can see, it was time for a replacement and an upgrade! Here is step by step how Julie and her Dad built a new, bigger and even more cat-friendly cat hide out!

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First- gather materials!

(Most of the materials can be found at any local Frederick hardware store.)

-Concrete tube form, 3/4 pine board, 2×4, screws, carpet, hemp rope, contact cement, recycled satellite dish
(Having a Dad or friend with some tools will make this project much easier!)

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Using concrete tube form, trace the arch for internal perches onto the 3/4 pine board. Cut out with a scroll saw.

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Stagger your perches inside the concrete tube form. Secure them with drywall screws.

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Measure and cut out scrap carpet. Attach with contact cement. **This part is very smelly!  Allow to dry for several days to help the smell to dissipate.IMG_7401

Measure and cut out opening in the satellite dish. Attach the dish to the concrete form tube with drywall screws.
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Cut out cat doors with a scroll saw.
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Measure and cut carpet scraps to fit around the concrete tube form.

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Using liquid nails in a caulking gun, glue the hemp rope around the cylinder.

Wrap cylinder with bungee cords to secure carpet as it dries.IMG_7411

After glue is dry and oder has dissipated, present the cat hide out to your buddies!

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Tip: There is no wrong way to build a cat hide out! Have fun with it 🙂

And remember to send pictures of your finished project to your favorite veterinarian- Kingsbrook Animal Hospital!

Badger the Whippet and his Fight for Life

We all know blood donation saves lives. Three of my dogs have been donors for the Blue Ridge Veterinary Blood Bank for several years. Even though they love it for the peanut butter and snuggles, I have seen blood donation first hand and what it can do.

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Badger, too sick to stand, at the hospital waiting for his blood transfusion.

His name is Badger. A cute 2 year old whippet who one day was not acting like his normal bubbly self. He became more and more lethargic and we noticed his gums were pale. After a visit with his veterinarian, we soon learned that Badger had Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia or IMHA. IMHA is a disease where the immune system attacks the red blood cells causing anemia. One way to assess the amount of red blood cells in the body is to run a blood test called a PCV or packed cell volume. A healthy dog will have a PCV between 35-55%. Although, he was immediately put on medications, Badger’s PCV fell to 13%. His only chance to survive was a blood transfusion. I remember the day we took him to the hospital to receive his transfusion. He was barely able to walk and his gums were white. He was so depressed. It was difficult to see him so sick.

Two days later, we were able to pick him up from the veterinary hospital. What a difference the blood transfusion had made! He was brighter and even able to trot out of the veterinary office much more like his usual self. Like most dogs with IMHA, we do not know why he developed the disease. With oral medications he is now able to live a normal life.

Badger on the day he went to his forever home!

Badger on the day he went to his forever home!

A few months after his blood transfusion, Badger found his forever home. He currently lives with 2 other whippets and is a normal healthy happy dog… all thanks to a canine blood donor.

When my dogs donate blood every 6-8 weeks, I think of Badger- a sweet little whippet who was given a second chance at life.

-Julie Fulghum, RVT at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

Click HERE for more information on how your dog can be a life saver to dogs like Badger.

 

 

 

Badger today!-

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Badger relaxing with his family.

 

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Cuddling with his new brother.

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Merry Christmas Badger!

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Badger the whippet.

 

Holiday Sneezing in Frederick, MD

Last Christmas, client service representative, Kelly, brought home her first real Christmas tree! Her mother was allergic, so she only had fake trees growing up. She excitedly put up her new tree, decorating it to perfection.

KELLYsugar!

Sugar

A couple hours later, her dog, Sugar, began sneezing. Kelly was disappointed, thinking Sugar was allergic to trees as well. Her house wouldn’t be filled with the smell of pine trees that reminded her of Christmas time. Over the next couple of hours, Sugar’s sneezes became more and more violent until she suddenly let out the sneeze of all sneezes. A mucous-covered pine needle shot out of Sugar’s nose and landed right on Kelly’s couch! “It was the most disgusting thing I’ve ever encountered,” says Kelly. Sugar continued to sneeze throughout the night and into the next morning.

Fearing she had another pine needle lodged in her nose, Kelly brought Sugar in to Kingsbrook Animal Hospital to see her veterinarian. Sugar was put on an antibiotic and an antihistamine and within a few days was feeling much better! You might be a client service representative’s pet if you snort a pine needle!

Kelly and Sugar

Kelly and Sugar