Tag Archives: Frederick MD Vets

Happy Bird Day From Kingsbrook Animal Hospital!

Mo really loves his morning coffee!

At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, we are very proud of our clients, our doctors, and our staff. This “KAH Pride” also includes our very own Mo!
When our hospital opened in Frederick, MD back in 1998, our doctors rescued four lovebirds and brought them here to help welcome clients to the hospital. Their names were Larry, Curly, Bob…and Mo.

 

Many worried or scared patients seek out Mo while they’re waiting in the lobby.

Mo’s cagemates were not very friendly towards him, and Mo ended up living on his own for a while. Over the next five years the other birds all passed away, and Mo was quite happy to move to “the big cage” out in the lobby in 2003! From his “perch” in the corner (you caught us, pun intended) Mo loves to welcome everyone to the hospital and to help comfort patients who are worried while waiting for their exams.

Over the years, Mo has had many adventures. Once, he was chased by a cat who escaped from his carrier, and was saved just in the nick of time by Eileen (a former CSR). This may have been the start of Mo’s legendary love of blondes!

 

Mo loves to be the first to tell Santa Paws what’s on his Christmas List!

Mo has always been the first patient to visit with Santa Paws every year. He is always excited to welcome all of our photo shoot guests and to help advertise the event. He has been in countless KAH Facebook posts, Instagram updates, blogs, and educational videos about caring for birds.  He really loves the camera!
One of Mo’s not-so-hidden talents is picking the Superbowl winner–with amazing accuracy! Videos of Mo selecting who will take home the Lombardi can be found on the Kingsbrook Animal Hospital Facebook page.

 

Mo even created his own logo while working towards becoming an official Angry Bird!

Fun fact–Mo also spent some time campaigning to be the next official Angry Bird. While he wasn’t the winner, all of KAH’s staff agrees that he has become a bit more temperamental over the years.

Occasionally, he will still select a new “favorite” person; for example, when Dr. Kemper began working at Kingsbrook, Mo took an instant shine to him.

 

 

Over the years, Mo has had some interesting interior design selections. Sometimes he absolutely loves his new perches or toys, and sometimes he seems almost afraid of them. In one particular instance, Mo was given a brand-new perch right before closing time–which he stared at quite suspiciously and proceeded to avoid completely. However, when our staff members came in to work the next day, Mo had gotten water on the perch and had turned himself completely blue!

Almost every Kingsbrook Animal Hospital staffer has a story or two about our beloved mascot. Stop in and visit with our iconic lovebird, and feel free to grab a selfie!

Healthy, Happy Senior Pets at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

The staff at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, MD, takes pride in providing excellent life-long care for our patients. As our patients age, our recommendations for their care change, too, because we want to help all animals live the longest, healthiest lives possible! Here, we’ll outline care for our patients who reach “senior” status.

KAH technician Julie's sweet kitty Calvin poses with his dinner--Science Diet Senior canned food. Yummy!

KAH technician Julie’s sweet kitty Calvin poses with his dinner–Science Diet Senior canned food. Yummy!

One commonly asked question is “When is my pet considered a senior?” At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, all patients over the age of 8 are considered seniors. As a side note, smaller-breed dogs such as Chihuahuas age more slowly than large-breed dogs like Labrador Retrievers. Good preventative health care is equally important for dogs of all sizes, though, so it’s important to be proactive with any patient’s care regardless of size! One easy way to do this is to switch a pet to a senior diet at the appropriate age. Senior diets contain lower levels of calcium, fats, and carbohydrates. This helps prevent less-active furry friends from becoming overweight, and it also puts less stress on their digestive tract and other organ systems. Most brands of pet food offer a senior formula, and KAH’s veterinarians are glad to discuss any nutrition questions during each physical exam.

Dr. Cook performs a physical exam on adorable patient Quinn. Exams provide lots of information about the health of a patient!

Dr. Cook performs a physical exam on adorable patient Quinn. Exams provide lots of information about the health of a patient!

Speaking of exams…Kingsbrook Animal Hospital recommends biannual office visits for all senior patients. This enables the veterinarian to perform a physical exam every 6 months, and catch any changes or issues much sooner. A good physical exam includes obtaining an up-to-date, accurate weight on a pet; listening to heart and lungs with a stethoscope; checking vital signs like body temperature and capillary refill time; feeling the patient for lumps and bumps; and looking inside the mouth at the teeth and gums. The exam is also an excellent time for pet owners to mention any changes noticed at home–for example: slow to get up in the mornings, not eating as well, or trouble seeing. Combining this information with the findings of the patient’s physical exam allows the veterinarian to determine if there are any issues that need to be medically addressed.

KAH assistant Robin and technician Rush draw blood on Maggie. Annual bloodwork for senior patients is one of the most important diagnostics in veterinary medicine.

KAH assistant Robin and technician Rush draw blood on Maggie. Annual bloodwork for senior patients is one of the most important diagnostics in veterinary medicine.

Another important recommendation is senior bloodwork. While many owners cringe a little at the financial implications, Kingsbrook Animal Hospital recommends performing lab work on all “senior” patients at least once a year. The blood work most often requested by the doctor includes a complete blood count (CBC), a serum chemistry panel, and a urinalysis. For cats, it will also screen for thyroid levels. The CBC portion looks at red and white blood cell counts, and differentiates between different types of these cells. Some problems detected by a CBC include anemia, dehydration, infection, and even certain bone marrow disorders. The serum chemistry gives values of over 25 different enzymes and proteins found in the blood. These enzymes help internal organ function.

KAH technician Morgan is reading a urinalysis! All urine samples submitted to KAH are read in-house.

KAH technician Morgan is reading a urinalysis! All urine samples submitted to KAH are read in-house.

Catching any changes to the liver or kidneys early can make an enormous difference in treatment and prognosis for a beloved pet. A urinalysis is an important adjunct to the blood panel, as it gives more information about the kidneys and allows the veterinarian to notice problems earlier than bloodwork alone will indicate them. Thyroid screening in older cats is very important, since hyperthyroidism is very common and can cause many other problems such as kidney failure, high blood pressure, heart arrhythmias, and digestive issues.

 

The staff at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital may make additional recommendations for senior patients–every pet is an individual!

Assisted Living For Animals: Senior Pet Tips From Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, we know our furry companions are more than just pets—they’re family members! Our animals live, sleep, eat, and play right alongside us, and they age with us as well. Just as aging can pose obstacles for humans, becoming a “senior” pet comes with some challenges too. Below, we’ll look at some of the common changes we see in our senior patients, and discuss what we can do at home (and at KAH!) to help make them more comfortable.

KAH technician Nora with her dog, Sam.

KAH technician Nora with her dog, Sam. Sam is almost 9 years old, and eats Hill’s j/d to help with her bones and joints!

One of the biggest changes we notice in senior pets is in their skeletal systems. Older bones and joints just don’t move like they used to, and patients may suffer from arthritis, hip dysplasia, or even a narrowing of the space between the bones of the spine. This can make getting up or lying down uncomfortable. Dogs may not want to jump up on the bed anymore or may have difficulty getting into the car; cats may spend less time on the top of the couch or in the window sills, preferring to nap in a sunbeam on the floor instead. To help with these problems, a joint supplement like Dasuquin® can help the pet’s body repair cartilage to reduce arthritis pain. Hills Prescription Diets offers j/d, a diet with glucosamine, chondriotin, and omega-3 fatty acids added in to help support aging joints.  Orthopedic foam beds are comfortable and provide good cushioning for achy pets. Stairs and ramps are available to make transitions in height easier on elderly pets. It’s also important to provide regular low-intensity exercise to keep pets mobile and active. Being sedentary increases stiffness in joints, and becoming overweight puts more stress on any patient’s bones.

KAH technician Lainey gently reassures Fuji as he wakes up from anesthesia.

KAH technician Lainey gently reassures Fuji   as he wakes up from anesthesia.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or pain medications can be prescribed by a veterinarian for long-term use in uncomfortable patients.

Another issue is hearing and vision loss. Aging pets often lose some of their hearing–which means it is harder to get their attention, but easier to startle them. Most pets will still respond to loud hand-claps or vibrations in the floor, but it’s best to approach deaf or partially-deaf pets slowly and gently to avoid a fear response. Dogs, especially, seem to lose some low-light vision and some depth perception as they get older. For these pets, steps and stairs become harder to navigate. Leaving lights on at night or teaching an older dog to begin sleeping downstairs can help to minimize falls and anxiety.

Even cats can go for walks! Make sure any pet that goes outdoors is receiving preventative medications for fleas, ticks, and heartworms.

Even cats can go for walks! Make sure any pet that goes outdoors is receiving preventative medications for fleas, ticks, and heartworms.

Some pets will experience cognitive dysfunction or dementia as they age, which can manifest with symptoms much like Alzheimer’s disease in humans. These pets can become anxious, may stare into space or wander in circles, and sometimes will vocalize randomly and repeatedly. Occasionally, there may even be a break in house- or litterbox-training. Purina ProPlan (Bright Minds) and Hills Prescription Diets (B/D) both offer diets that can help with these symptoms, and there are many medications available with a veterinary prescription that will make pets with cognitive dysfunction more comfortable. Keeping pets engaged and stimulated with walks, playtime, and new activities will reduce some stress and anxiety. Providing extra potty breaks for dogs or extra litterboxes for cats can also help to mitigate some of these changes.

Sweet and Surprising Senior Pets At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

It’s November, and fall is well under way!  This month is the ASPCA’s National “Adopt A Senior Pet” month. Here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, MD, each week in November we will focus on different topics concerning our senior furry friends, and things we can do to help make their later years more comfortable and enjoyable.

KAH assistant Tiki with her senior dog Ethel

KAH assistant Tiki with her senior dog Ethel

Often people are concerned about rescuing a dog or cat because of the perception that most animals who end up in shelters have behavior problems. Only an estimated ten percent of pets in shelters have been surrendered for behavioral reasons. The more common reasons animals end up in shelters are issues with other pets in the home; expanding their family (getting married/having a baby); allergies; divorce; financial reasons; and saddest of all, owners who pass away or are relocating to assisted living or nursing homes where they are unable to keep their beloved friend.  Many of the pets currently in animal shelters (between 60-70%) are senior pets. By shelter standards, this means they are five years old or older.

 

KAH patient Scout is a handsome and loving 7-year-old rescue.

KAH patient Scout is a handsome and loving 7-year-old rescue.

There are many great benefits to adopting an older pet. For example, their personality is already formed and easy to read; what you see is what you get, unlike with a puppy or kitten that hasn’t quite developed his or her identity yet. Another perk is that “senior” pets are more content to just be close companions. They aren’t as prone to destructive behavior or high-energy antics, so they will spend more time with their new owner (and their new owner doesn’t have to worry about training/managing a puppy or kitten!). Usually, older pets are already used to living in a house, so they arrive in their new homes housetrained/litterbox trained and accustomed to human schedules.

It’s true that some “senior” pets may require a little more right off the bat in the way of veterinary care. All pets will require preventatives and vaccinations, but an older pet usually has all of the “puppy shots” or “kitten shots” already. That being said, it’s a wise idea to take a potential new furry family member to the veterinarian right away to determine if there are any health concerns that may pose a financial problem.

Sweet, gentle rescue dog Lincoln made his first visit to KAH at 17 years old!

Sweet, gentle rescue dog Lincoln made his first visit to KAH at 17 years old!

The best advantage of all to adopting a senior dog or cat is knowing that they won’t become just a statistic–rescuing an older pet is definitely saving a life, since unfortunately these animals are at the highest risk of being euthanized because of shelter overcrowding. Welcoming one of these gentle, loving pets into a new family makes a real difference.

For more information, check out www.srdogs.com and www.petfinder.com/adopt-a-senior-pet-month.

KAH Technician Katie with patient Billy

KAH Technician Katie with patient Billy

Fall In Love With Kingsbrook Animal Hospital: Meet Our Doctors!

Last but certainly not least, Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, MD, invites you to Fall In Love with our amazing veterinarians! We have six doctors who help our clients and staff members take wonderful care of our pets. Below, each of them takes a moment to answer the same question we’ve asked every employee: What’s your favorite thing about working at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital?

Dr. Cook with patient Daisy

Dr. Cook with patient Daisy

Dr. Cook—”My favorite thing about Kingsbrook Animal Hospital is that I get to play with puppies and kittens all day everyday!  😉  Obviously, that’s not ALL we do.  The great thing about our Hospital is that  we all work so well together.  We see so many sick and yes, sometimes dying patients.  There’s a lot of stressors that could make us not get along, but everyone here is so good at working together and solving each case as though it were a puzzle.”  Dr. Cook shared. One of the owners and founders of KAH, Dr. Cook has been one of the driving forces behind this hospital since March 1999.

 

 

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Dr. Davis with patient Pumpkin

Dr. Davis—As the second co-founder/owner of Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, Dr. Davis has also been here since KAH’s beginnings in March 1999. “Well, I don’t have to change diapers here… but really my favorite thing about coming to work is the awesome staff we have, and getting to work with such wonderful people every day.”

 

 

 

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Dr. Cardella with patient Henry

 

Dr. Cardella—”I love all of our patients and working with the people that are attached to them. And I love the KAH family, which are the greatest and most caring people to work with.” Dr. Cardella has been working at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital since March 1999.

 

 

Dr. Walker with patient Winx

Dr. Walker with patient Winx

Dr. Walker—Dr. Walker joined the KAH team in June 2009. Her favorite thing is “…the fact that education is so central to our staff, from the doctors all the way through to the CSRs—we’re constantly working to stay current and practice the most advanced medicine.”

 

 

 

Dr. Lynch

Dr. Lynch with patient Penelope

Dr. Lynch—One of the KAH veterinarians since February 2014, Dr. Lynch’s favorite thing about working at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital is “Obviously, the people–that’s a no-brainer! In addition to the fact that we all work really well together, we’re all friends as well and really enjoy spending time with one another outside of work, too.” Dr. Lynch also worked at KAH from October 2005 until August 2007 as a technician!

 

 

 

 

Dr. Riley with Lulu

Dr. Riley with Lulu

Dr. Riley— “My favorite thing about Kingsbrook has to be the professionalism and dedication of the entire staff, from our CSRs to our technicians and of course the other veterinarians,” says Dr. Riley. Our newest doctor, she joined KAH in February 2016.

 

 

 

 

It’s hard to believe that October is almost over…soon it will be the holiday season, which usually means an increased focus on family. Here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, we believe pets are family members, too! The increased hustle and bustle of the holidays can affect our furry friends, especially our older companions. During the month of November, our KAH blog is focusing exclusively on senior pets and specific aspects of caring for them.

In the meantime, however, Happy Halloween from your friends at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital!

Fall In Love With Kingsbrook Animal Hospital: Meet Our Technicians!

October 16-22 is National Veterinary Technician Appreciation Week. At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, we appreciate our wonderful technicians every day—and we know our clients do too! Veterinary technicians have many roles, including surgical nurse, dental hygienist, laboratory technician, triage, counselor, and patient advocate. Here’s KAH’s current lineup of all-star veterinary technicians, and their answers to the question “What’s your favorite thing about working at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital?”

 

Lainey with an adorable Corgi pup!

Lainey with an adorable Corgi pup!

 

Lainey—Lainey has been part of the Kingsbrook family since July 2013. Her favorite thing about KAH is that “…we approach every patient as an individual, and tailor everything to that specific patient. We’re not a ‘cookie-cutter’ or a ‘one-size-fits-all’ practice.”

 

 

 

Abby with patient Abbie

Abby with patient Abbie

Abby— “Transitioning from volunteer to intern, going through school and becoming a technician—the best constant throughout it all was the people: the clients and the staff. It was such a wonderful experience!” says brand-new technician Abby (she just passed her boards in July!). Abby has been at KAH since January 2015.

 

 

 

KAH technician Katie, cuddling a sweet kitty!

KAH technician Katie, cuddling a sweet kitty!

Katie—Katie says the best thing about Kingsbrook Animal Hospital is “Our entire staff—technicians, assistants, CSRs, and doctors—is like one big family. I love coming in to work every day and getting to spend time with everybody!” She’s worked at KAH since May 2014.

 

 

 

 

KAH technician Sam

KAH technician Sam

Sam— Sam has also been at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital since May 2014. Her favorite thing about KAH is that every day is different, and it’s always an adventure!

 

 

 

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KAH technician Rush

Rush—Rush is a newer member of the Kingsbrook Animal Hospital team, having started with us March 2016; he’s also a newly-licensed technician, having passed the boards in July 2016 with Abby and Morgan. Rush says his favorite thing about KAH is “..we hold ourselves to a really high standard of care, even more than just being an AAHA hospital.”

 

 

Nora with patient Alfalfa

Nora with patient Alfalfa

Nora—Nora’s response was: “My favorite thing about working at Kingsbrook is the amazing group of people I get share my days and efforts with.” Nora is one of KAH’s original employees; she’s been here since July 2000!

 

 

 

Morgan with an incredibly cute Boston terrier pup

Morgan with an incredibly cute Boston terrier pup

 

Morgan—Morgan is the third member of Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s trio of technicians who became licensed in July 2016; she has been a KAH team member since November 2014. Morgan shared that “Being a part of a variety of situations where we have the opportunity to use all of our skills as well as learn new ones,” is her favorite thing about working at Kingsbrook.

 

 

 

KAH technician/manager Julie, with patient Jake

KAH technician/manager Julie, with patient Jake

 

Julie—In addition to being a veterinary technician, Julie is one of our two office managers. “I would have to say my favorite thing is the awesome staff we have–from being a part of bringing each person into the team, to the training, to working with each person every day. We all have individual strengths and really balance each other out into a well-rounded team, which enables us to provide great service for our clients,” she shared. Julie has been part of this Kingsbrook team since Sept 2010.

 

 

Melissa with patient Samantha

KAH manager/technician Melissa, with patient Samantha

Melissa—Melissa is the other half of our excellent management/technician duo. She has worked at Kingsbrook since July 2004. Her favorite thing about KAH is “Community outreach and involvement; it lets us be a real part of the community and interact with our wonderful clients in less structured situations.”

 

 

 

There’s only one week left in October, and one more group of Kingsbrook Animal Hospital staff members to introduce! The uncontested celebrities of our team, the KAH veterinarians are the stars of our final “Fall In Love With Kingsbrook” entry. Stop by next week to meet our amazing doctors!

Fall In Love With Kingsbrook Animal Hospital: Meet Our Assistants!

Our Veterinary Assistants at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital are an important part of the team. They set up appointments, care for our hospitalized patients, take radiographs, and even help fill in for our CSRs from time to time…among lots of other things! We’re excited to have the opportunity to introduce our current Assistant team this week.

 

 

KAH Assistant Ann with Henry

KAH Assistant Ann with Henry

Ann—Ann is one of Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s first employees; she’s been with us since March 1999! Ann says the one of the best things about KAH is that we are extremely environmentally conscious: we recycle, use green cleaning products, and source our electricity from wind power.

 

 

KAH Assistant Heather

KAH Assistant Heather

 

Heather—Heather’s favorite thing about Kingsbrook Animal Hospital is “working in such a supportive and caring environment, with such amazing coworkers!” Heather has been part of our staff since July 2015.

 

 

 

Robin with the one and only Johnny Blaze!

Robin with the one and only Johnny Blaze!

Robin—Robin joined our staff in December of 2015. “We practice a very high quality of medicine while allowing our clients to be a part of their patient’s care—that’s my favorite thing about working at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital,” she says.

 

 

 

KAH Assistant Ebony with patient Wilson

KAH Assistant Ebony with patient Wilson

Ebony—Ebony is a technician’s assistant who has been working at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital since October 2015. Her favorite thing about working at KAH is interacting with patients of all species, and the satisfaction of helping animals.

 

 

 

KAH Assistant Tiki with patient Harry

KAH Assistant Tiki with patient Harry

 

Tiki—Tiffany T usually goes by Tiki while she’s at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital! Tiki’s favorite thing about KAH is definitely her team members. She’s been an employee at KAH since August 2011.

 

 

 

 

As you can see, we have a fantastic team of assistants! Next week (October 16-22) is Veterinary Technician Appreciation Week, so we’ll be introducing our superlative technician staff. Check in next week to meet these vital KAH team members!

 

The Top Ten Reasons To Adopt A Black Cat (by Kingsbrook Animal Hospital)

Statistically, black cats are have the lowest adoption rates. Why? Who knows! Maybe it’s the superstition that black cats are unlucky. Maybe it’s difficult for people to make a connection with a black cat in a poorly-lit kennel. Or maybe it’s because black cats don’t show up as well in photographs as their lighter colored comrades. Whatever the reason, black cats deserve a loving home, just like any other cat.

Registered technician Katie Bruner, cuddling a sweet tuxedo kitty. "Tuxedo" cats are those that are mostly black, with white feet and a white chest.

Registered technician Katie Bruner, cuddling a sweet tuxedo kitty. “Tuxedo” cats are those that are mostly black, with white feet and a white chest.

If you’re considering adding a kitty to your family, here are our top 10 reasons to pick a black cat!

10. You’ll never lose your black cat in a snowstorm.

9. Black goes with everything!

8. Black cats look like little panthers. Who doesn’t want a mini, tame panther??

7. Black is beautiful!

6. When you love a black cat, luck is on your side!

New patient Stanley has just finished his squeeze cheese... now it's playtime!

New patient Stanley has just finished his squeeze cheese… now it’s playtime!

5. Black cats are loving.

4. Black is slimming!

3. Research has shown that black cats may be more resistant to disease than other cats.

2. They make the perfect accessory for your witch/warlock costume for your Halloween party!

1. Black cats are least likely to be adopted.

Kingsbrook assistant Abby shows off an adorable five-week-old black kitten…who could say no to this sleepy little face?

If you’re looking for a black cat, make sure to check out Frederick County Animal Control, located right here in Frederick, MD. Don’t forget that the veterinarians here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital don’t discriminate against black cats– all cats matter!

Laser Therapy at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital

Veterinary medicine is a field that’s constantly changing and evolving; there are new medicines and treatments available for our pets almost every day. Here at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital in Frederick, one advance that we were quick to embrace was a therapy laser.

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Veterinary Assistants Rush and Abby perform laser therapy on Penelope’s surgical incision

Laser therapy uses specific wavelengths of light to treat pain. The therapy laser has a handpiece that directs the light and focuses it on the area that’s being treated. Laser therapy can be used for almost any kind of pain—a veterinarian may prescribe laser therapy for chronic joint pain (such as arthritis or hip dysplasia), for post-surgical pain (like a cruciate repair), or for wound care. It can even be used on gum tissue after oral surgery, or to treat pain associated with ear infections! New uses for laser therapy are being discovered all the time.

 

One of the best things about laser therapy is that it’s a non-invasive, easy way to treat our furry friends. Treatments are usually very quick (anywhere from 3-5 minutes total) and can be accompanied by lots of petting and treats. It can be used in conjunction with many medications and is painless as well as stress-free. At Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, therapy is usually started with three treatments the first week, two treatments the second week, and one last treatment in week three before the veterinarian assesses how the laser therapy is helping.

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Veterinary Assistant Heather takes a moment to pose with Priscilla before starting treatment

Only a few veterinarians in Frederick have a therapy laser, but the number is growing. Is laser therapy right for your animal companion? Ask your veterinarian, at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital, to find out more about this great new option for treating pain in pets!

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Veterinary Technician Sam cuddles Gideon during his laser therapy!

Crafting with KAH: Make your own doggie ‘Potty Bell’ in Frederick, MD

Kingsbrook Animal Hospital’s DIY “Potty Bell” for dogs!

Even if you don’t live in Frederick, MD- this is a great idea to help with training your dog!

Materials needed:

Ribbon

Bells

‘D’ ring (or key ring)

Scissors

Lighter

Hot glue gun

08-Tiff Project 1


Step 1. Tie a loop around your doorknob and “measure” how big the loop needs to be and how long.

01-Tiff Project 2

Step 2. Cut the ribbon a little longer than the desired length (this gives you room to tie on the bells later).

02-Tiff Project 3

Step 3. Singe the end of your ribbon with a lighter to prevent fraying.
03-Tiff Project 4

Step 4. Slide the bells onto the D-ring or Key ring.

04-Tiff Project 5

Step 5. Tie the end of the ribbon (opposite side of doorknob loop) onto the D-ring or Key-ring.

 

05-Tiff Project 6

Step 6. Tie a bow onto the unfinished knots, cut and singe ends.

06-Tiff Project 8

Step 7. Re-enforce the bow by placing a small amount of hot glue under the bow’s knot.

09-Tiff Project 9

Step 8. Tie a bow to loop around door knob.

07-Tiff Project 7

Step 9: Hang on your door and introduce to your pup!

10-Tiff Project 10

 

*For tips on how to teach your dog to use the ‘Potty Bell,’ call us at Kingsbrook Animal Hospital 301-631-6900.

Remember- we love to see your final projects! Share your pictures with your favorite veterinarian- Kingsbrook Animal Hospital!