Monthly Archives: September 2012

Cow turned Horse


LAUFEN, Germany (AP) — When Regina Mayer’s parents dashed her hopes
of getting a horse, the resourceful 15-year-old didn’t sit in her room
and sulk. Instead, she turned to a cow called Luna to make her riding
dreams come true.

Hours of training, and tons of treats, cajoling and caresses later,
the results are impressive: not only do the two regularly go on long
rides through the southern German countryside, they do jumps over a
makeshift hurdle of beer crates and painted logs.

“She thinks she’s a horse,” the golden-haired Mayer joked on a recent
sunny afternoon as she sat atop the impassive brown-and-white,
grass-munching cow.

It all started about two years ago, shortly after Luna was born on the
Mayers’ sprawling farm in the hamlet of Laufen, just minutes from the
Austrian border.

They started off with walks in the woods during which Luna wore a
halter. Then Mayer slowly got her cow more accustomed to human contact
and riding equipment.

About six months later, it was time to see how Luna would respond to a
rider on her back. Mayer sat in the saddle, and all went as planned –
at least at first.

“She was really well behaved and walked normally,” said Mayer, decked
out in riding gear. “But after a couple of meters, she wanted me to
get off! You could see that she got a bit peeved.”

Luna and Mayer are now soul mates, spending most afternoons together
once the teen – who aspires to become a nurse one day – comes home
from school.

Their extensive routine involves grooming, petting, jumps and a
roughly one-hour ride. That’s also the case in winter, when Mayer
lovingly drapes a blanket over Luna to keep her warm.

It’s a lot of work “but I enjoy it,” Mayer said.

Her efforts have paid off.

Now, Luna understands commands such as “go,” `’stand” and “gallop.” If
she feels like it, that is.

“When she wants to do something she does it, when she doesn’t, she
doesn’t,” said Mayer, who proudly says Luna thinks of her as her
mother. “And she’s often very headstrong but can also be really
adorable.”

Luna’s stubborn streak meant that teaching her pony tricks wasn’t
always easy, Mayer noted, saying she sought tips from a cow expert in
Switzerland on how to deal with “steering” problems.

Anne Wiltafsky, who trains cows near the Swiss city of Zurich, said
Luna’s talents are not particularly surprising and that, historically,
it was quite common to ride cows and use them as workhorses.

“Especially younger ones can jump really well,” Wiltafsky said in a
telephone interview, adding that cows are lovable companions because
they’re easygoing, have strong nerves and are “unbelievably devoted”
to people they like.

Being – and owning – a cow-turned-pony isn’t always easy.

Take the somewhat skeptical neighbors, such as Martin Putzhammer, who
had to be won over.

“At first I thought it was kind of weird – a kid on a cow?” the
17-year-old said during a break from repairing his moped. “Had to get
used to it but once I did I thought it was pretty funny.”

While Mayer’s friends quickly warmed to her passion after laughing at
her, Luna’s fellow cows weren’t so open-minded.

“Cows don’t really like her … they’re jealous because she always
gets goodies,” Mayer said.

And horses? Many run away in fright, but others often join Luna on rides.

“She really enjoys that and gets totally into it,” Mayer said.

Mayer hasn’t given up her hopes of having a horse and may soon get
one. But she says Luna will always have a special place in her heart.

“She’ll stay my darling,” she said.

To watch the video go to http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/06/cow-jump-regina-mayer_n_845617.html

The Huffington Post/AP

Halloween Costume Contest

Halloween is only 5 weeks away! We are hosting a pet costume contest, judged by the staff of KAH.
Email pictures to tech@kingsbrookvet.com. Please include your name, pets name, age and a short description.
 Entries will be accepted until Friday, October 26th.
Winners will be announced on Facebook and be notified by email.
 PRIZES ARE AS FOLLOWS: 1st Place $50 credit on your Kingsbrook account, 2nd and 3rd Place $25 credit on your Kingsbrook account.

Disaster Preparedness ( from ASPCA)


Emergencies come in many forms, and they may require anything from a brief absence from your home to permanent evacuation. Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep your pets safe. The best thing you can do for yourself and your pets is to be prepared.

Step 1 Get a Rescue Alert Sticker
This easy-to-use sticker will let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers, and that it includes 1) the types and number of pets in your household; 2) the name of your veterinarian; and 3) your veterinarian’s phone number. If you must evacuate with your pets, and if time allows, write “EVACUATED” across the stickers.
To get a free emergency pet alert sticker for your home, please fill out our online order form ; please allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. Your local pet supply store may also sell similar stickers.

Step 2 Arrange a Safe Haven
Arrange a safe haven for your pets in the event of evacuation. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. Remember, if it isn’t safe for you, it isn’t safe for your pets. They may become trapped or escape and be exposed to numerous life-threatening hazards. Note that not all Red Cross disaster shelters accept pets, so it is imperative that you have determined where you will bring your pets ahead of time:
Contact your veterinarian for a list of preferred boarding kennels and facilities.
Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets. Identify hotels or motels outside of your immediate area that accept pets.
Ask friends and relatives outside your immediate area if they would be willing to take in your pet.

Step 3 Emergency Supplies and Traveling Kits
Keep an Evac-Pack and supplies handy for your pets. Make sure that everyone in the family knows where it is. This kit should be clearly labeled and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your pack include:

Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include, or visit the ASPCA Store to buy one online)
3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate every two months)
Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
Litter or paper toweling
Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
Pet feeding dishes
Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires (Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit—otherwise they may go bad or become useless.)
Bottled water, at least 7 days’ worth for each person and pet (store in a cool, dry place and replace every two months)
A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
Flashlight
Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make “Lost” posters)
Especially for cats: Pillowcase or EvackSack, toys, scoopable litter
Especially for dogs: Extra leash, toys and chew toys, a week’s worth of cage liner.
You should also have an emergency kit for the human members of the family. Items to include: Batteries, duct tape, flashlight, radio, multi-tool, tarp, rope, permanent marker, spray paint, baby wipes, protective clothing and footwear, extra cash, rescue whistle, important phone numbers, extra medication and copies of medical and insurance information.

Step 4 Choose “Designated Caregivers”
This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence. He or she should be someone who is generally home during the day while you are at work or has easy access to your home. A set of keys should be given to this trusted individual. This may work well with neighbors who have pets of their own—you may even swap responsibilities, depending upon who has accessibility.
When selecting a permanent caregiver, you’ll need to consider other criteria. This is a person to whom you are entrusting the care of your pet in the event that something should happen to you. When selecting this “foster parent,” consider people who have met your pet and have successfully cared for animals in the past. Be sure to discuss your expectations at length with a permanent caregiver, so he or she understands the responsibility of caring for your pet.

Step 5 Evacuation Preparation
If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. If you think you may be gone for only a day, assume that you may not be allowed to return for several weeks. When recommendations for evacuation have been announced, follow the instructions of local and state officials. To minimize evacuation time, take these simple steps:

Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible.
Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification. Your pet’s ID tag should contain his name, telephone number, and any urgent medical needs. Be sure to write your pet’s name, your name and contact information on your pet’s carrier.

The ASPCA recommends microchipping your pet as a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted in the animal’s shoulder area, and can be read by scanner at most animal shelters.
Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented and wander away from home during a crisis.
Consider your evacuation route and call ahead to make arrangements for boarding your pet outside of the danger zone at the first sign of disaster.
Step 6 Geographic and Climatic Considerations
Do you live in an area that is prone to certain natural catastrophes, such as tornadoes, earthquakes or floods? If so, you should plan accordingly.
Determine well in advance which rooms offer safe havens. These rooms should be clear of hazards such as windows, flying debris, etc.
Choose easy-to-clean areas such as utility rooms, bathrooms, and basements as safe zones.
Access to a supply of fresh water is particularly important. In areas that may lose electricity, fill up bathtubs and sinks ahead of time to ensure that you have access to water during a power outage or other crises.
In the event of flooding, go to the highest location in your home, or a room that has access to counters or high shelves where your animals can take shelter.
If emergency officials recommend that you stay in your home, it’s crucial that you keep your pets with you. Keep your Evac-Pack and supplies close at hand. Your pets may become stressed during the in-house confinement, so you may consider crating them for safety and comfort.

Special Considerations for Birds
Birds should be transported in a secure travel cage or carrier.
In cold weather, make certain you have a blanket over your pet’s cage. This may also help reduce the stress of traveling.
In warm weather, carry a spray bottle to periodically moisten your bird’s feathers.
Have recent photos available, and keep your bird’s leg bands on for identification.
If the carrier does not have a perch, line it with paper towels that you can change frequently.
Keep the carrier in as quiet an area as possible.
It is particularly imperative that birds eat on a daily basis, so purchase a timed feeder. If you need to leave your bird unexpectedly, the feeder will ensure his daily feeding schedule.
Items to keep on hand: Catch net, heavy towel, blanket or sheet to cover cage, cage liner.

Special Considerations for Reptiles
A snake may be transported in a pillowcase, but you should have permanent and secure housing for him when you reach a safe place.
Take a sturdy bowl that is large for your pet to soak in. It’s also a good idea to bring along a heating pad or other warming device, such as a hot water bottle.
Lizards can be transported like birds (see above).

Special Considerations for Small Animals
Small animals, such as hamsters, gerbils, mice and guinea pigs, should be transported in secure carriers with bedding materials, food and food bowls.
Items to keep on hand: Salt lick, extra water bottle, small hidebox or tube, a week’s worth of bedding.

Breeder’s Choice recalls AvoDerm dog food for possible salmonella risk

Breeder’s Choice Pet Food is recalling a single manufacturing batch of its AvoDerm Natural Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Adult Dog Formula due to possible contamination with salmonella.

The Irwindale-based company said the product being recalled is the 26 lb.-sized AvoDerm Natural Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Adult Dog Formula with the “best before” dates of Aug. 28, 2013; Aug. 29, 2013 and Aug. 30, 2013.

Breeder’s Choice said it is issuing the recall notification because a sample of the manufacturing batch tested positive for salmonella. No human or pet illnesses have been reported so far, it said.
The product was originally manufactured on Aug. 29 and distributed Aug. 30 and 31 in California, Georgia, Illinois, Nevada, Virginia and Washington.

“Breeder’s Choice Pet Foods has taken immediate action to remove the product from all applicable distribution centers and retail customers, and is fully investigating the cause,” the company said in a statement.

The company said consumers who bought the recalled product should contact Breeder’s Choice customer service representatives at 1-866-500-6286 or visit its website for more information.
Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people exposed to salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers, the company said.

Pets with salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. Breeder’s Choice said to contact a veterinarian if a pet that has consumed the recalled product has these symptoms.

L.A. Biz

If Dogs Were Your Teacher


You would learn stuff like:

When loved ones come home, always run to greet them.

Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride.

Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your
face to be pure ecstasy.

Take naps and stretch before rising.

Run, romp, and play daily.

Thrive on attention and let people touch you.

Avoid biting, when a simple growl will do.

On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass.

On hot days, drink lots of water and lay under a shady tree.

When you’re happy, dance around and wag your entire body.

Delight in the simple joy of a long walk.

Eat with gusto and enthusiasm. Stop when you have had enough.

Never pretend to be something you’re not.

If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it.

When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by
and nuzzle them gently.

A Dog Poem By: Author Unknown

San Diego Zoo’s baby panda said to be doing fine after exam

Good news from the San Diego Zoo: The baby panda born July 29 passed its first close-up physical examination.

The panda was reported to be a robust 1.5-pounds, with a strong heart, good lungs, a calm demeanor, and a distinctive voice. The exam lasted but three minutes; the rule with panda cubs is for keepers to remain at a distance to let mother and baby bond properly.

There were limits to what could be observed: Veterinarians are still not sure about the baby’s gender.
While the exam was underway, keepers were watching mother Bai Yun to see if separation anxiety set in. It did not, zoo officials said.

The cub is Bai Yun’s sixth offspring since arriving at the zoo. But repetition has not dulled her talent for motherhood. She quickly cradled the cub when the two were reunited, officials said.

Plans are for Bai Yun and the offspring to remain in the den for several months, visible to the public on the zoo’s panda cam.