Bat in Glen Burnie, Maryland, Test Positive for Rabies

July 11, 2014

Recently in Glen Burnie, Maryland the Anne Arundel County Department of Health reported that a bat found in Hidden Woods Apartments in the 400 block of Hidden Brook Drive, Glen Burnie Maryland tested positive for the rabies virus. Tenants of the apartment complex reported seeing the bat in the laundry room and a stairwell. Glen Burnie, Maryland officials said anyone who may have had physical contact with a bat or anyone who wakes up to find a bat flying around in the room with them or anyone who has discovered bats flying around in a room where there are small children should immediately contact the Anne Arundel County Department of Health at 410-222-7256 before 5pm or 443-481-3140 after 5pm. If you suspect that your pet may have had contact with the rabid bat contact Anne Arundel County Animal Control at 410- 222-8900 or visit them at 411 Maxwell Frye Rd, Millersville, MD 21108.

Often humans come in contact with bats roosting in apartment complexes or bats roosting in children’s playhouse or bats roosting in a tree house which can create a dangerous situation. Groups of bats called bat colonies roost in attics often. Bats enter attics through gaps in soffits or bats entering openings in vents that are not bat proof. The best way to protect your family from rabies exposure is to have an annual bat inspection performed by an Anne Arundel County Bat expert. If you would like to have a Glen Burnie Bat professional conduct a bat inspection call 443- 417-3137.

Not reporting a bat bite or exposure to a rabid bat can kill you. In 2012’ a 63 year old Massachusetts man died from rabies after being bitten by a rabid bat. Health officials confirmed that the man was infected with rabies by a Little Brown Bat which is one of the most populated species of bat in the United States. The 63 year old man did not even know he had been bitten by a bat and was ill the entire month before he died. Officials suspect that he was most likely bitten by a rabid Little Brown Bat while sleeping in his historical home. The man’s neighbors were shocked when they found out about the death and said, “We’ve all had our run-ins with bats, but I never knew that it could be so dangerous”.

For more information about bat to human rabies cases visithttp://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/rabies/information/bats/ or for more information about human rabies cases in the United States attributed to bat rabies visit file:///C:/Users/Admin/Downloads/HumanRabiesCases%20(2).pdf .

Another Bat Captured in Gaithersburg Tests Positive for Rabies

July 23rd, 2015

ABS 7 News

GAITHERSBURG, Md. (WJLA) — Gaithersburg officials say a bat that was captured in an occupied condominium earlier this week has tested positive for rabies.

Officials say Gaithersburg Animal Control responded to a call in the 800 block of Quince Orchard Boulevard on July 21 about a bat.{} The bat was captured and euthanized by the officers and was subsequently tested for rabies.{} Test results for the rabies virus came back positive. Gaithersburg officials say if you were in direct contact with a bat in that area in the last few weeks you need to call Montgomery County Health Department immediately at 240-777-1755. Additionally, if your pet had contact with a bat in this area in the last few weeks officials ask that you call Gaithersburg Animal Control at 301-258-6343.

Rabid Bat Captured in Gaithersburg Apartment

City officials say any people or pets that come in contact with the bat must be treated for the fatal disease.

Gaithersburg Patch

Gaithersburg, MD

By DEB BELT (Patch Staff) July 15, 2015

A rabid bat was found in a Gaithersburg apartment last week, prompting city officials to urge residents to be sure their pets are vaccinated. Rabies is a neurological disease that can be fatal to humans, as well as animals. It is spread by the bite or scratch of an infected animal, such as a raccoon, fox or bat. It is also spread when the infected animal’s saliva comes in contact with the eyes, nose, mouth or open cut of a person or another animal.

Gaithersburg Animal Control officers captured a nuisance bat in an occupied apartment in the 40 block of Dalamar Street on Friday. The bat was euthanized and tested for rabies; the city says test results confirmed the bat was infected with the rabies virus.

If you were in direct contact with a bat in this area in the last several weeks, city officials say you should contact Montgomery County Health Department immediately at 240-777-1755. If your pet came into contact with a bat in this area recently, contact Gaithersburg Animal Control at 301-258-6343.

The only way to prevent rabies in your pet is through regular vaccinations. It is extremely important that all dogs or cats you own be properly vaccinated against this disease, says the city. If your pet is not currently vaccinated, contact your veterinarian immediately to schedule an appointment. Gaithersburg City Code requires all dogs and cats must be licensed with the City of Gaithersburg.

For more information and for a list of summer rabies clinics, contact the City of Gaithersburg Office of Animal Control at 301-258-6343 or visit the city’s website atwww.gaithersburgmd.gov.

Rabies for Pet Owners

General Information About Rabies 

  • Rabies is a virtually 100% fatal viral infection of the brain and spinal cord.
  • The virus itself is a bullet-shaped, RNA virus that essentially cannot survive in the environment.
  • Rabies virus can infect any mammal, but only carnivores and bats maintain the infection naturally. Livestock, rodents, rabbits and other non-biting animals can be infected but very rarely transmit the virus.
  • It can take more than six months for a person or animal to develop signs of rabies after being infected, but once signs develop, the infection is practically always fatal.
  • The best way to prevent and control rabies is to vaccinate cats, dogs and ferrets, and to prevent all contact of people and pets with wildlife that may be infected with the virus, such as racoons, skunks, bats and foxes.

How Common is Rabies?

  • Rabies occurs worldwide, but there are some areas in Europe and some island nations that are rabies-free.
  • About 50 000 people worldwide die from rabies each year, mostly in India and areas where rabies is still very common in dogs.
  • In the USA, Canada and western Europe, rabies is found in certain species of local wildlife such as racoons, skunks, bats, foxes, and coyotes. In different areas, one or two or these species may be considered the main source of the virus. Infection in pets or people in these areas is usually a result of contact with infected wildlife.
  • In 2004, 7000 cases of animal rabies were reported in the USA, 2500 of which were in racoons.
  • In the USA, but not Canada, rabies is now more commonly reported in cats than in dogs.
  • From 2000 to 2006, there were 15 reported cases of human rabies in the USA, nine of which were the result of exposure to bats, and four of which were the result of exposure to rabid dogs. In the same period, only two cases of human rabies were reported in Canada, which were associated with exposure to bats.

How Is Rabies Spread?

  • Rabies virus is usually transmitted by the bite of an infected animal through its saliva. If the saliva gets in the mouth, nose, eyes or a cut on a person or animal, the virus can be transmitted without a bite.
  • An animal’s bite can be infectious before the animal looks sick.
  • The most common source of rabies in human cases worldwide is dogs, but in the USA and Canada it is bats.
  • It can be hard to tell if a pet has been bitten by another animal, especially a bat, if the wound is small and covered with fur. People can be bitten by small bats without realizing it, especially if the bat bites them while they are sleeping.

How Do I Know If My Pet Or A Wild Animal Has Rabies?

The only way to know for sure if an animal has rabies is test for virus in the brain, which cannot be done while the animal is alive. An animal may not show signs of being sick for weeks or months after being infected, but once the signs appear they progress quickly and the animal will die within about ten days. The most obvious sign of rabies is any kind of strange change in behaviour.

  • Some animals become very vicious, and will attack other animals, objects or even their own bodies.
  • Animals that usually only come out at night, like bats and skunks, may come out during the day.
  • Some animals may lose control of their legs and walk strangely, or not be able to walk at all.
  • Wild animals may lose their fear of people, which may make them seem friendly, but they’re very dangerous.

In a dog or a cat, the first signs may be more subtle. The animal just might not be itself. Sometimes their meow or bark might sound different, and some animals have trouble swallowing and therefore drool a lot. If your pet is behaving strangely, especially if it goes outside a lot, keep it in a quiet area by itself and contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Biting Animals and Rabies Suspects

  • All human-animal bites should be reported to your local health department. They will likely also recommend that the bitten person should see a doctor right away. All human-animal bites should be reported to your local health department. They will likely also recommend that the bitten person should see a doctor right away.
  • Any dog, cat or ferret that has bitten a human should be isolated for at least ten days to ensure it does not develop signs of rabies. An infected animal will rarely have virus in its saliva for longer than this before it becomes sick. Any dog, cat or ferret that has bitten a human should be isolated for at least ten days to ensure it does not develop signs of rabies. An infected animal will rarely have virus in its saliva for longer than this before it becomes sick.
  • By law, ANY animal suspected of having rabies must be reported to the government. If it has bitten a person or pet, the animal may be euthanized and tested for rabies. By law, ANY animal suspected of having rabies must be reported to the government. If it has bitten a person or pet, the animal may be euthanized and tested for rabies.
  • Any unvaccinated pet that is bitten by a potentially rabid animal must either be euthanized or isolated for at least six months to ensure it does not develop rabies. The required isolation period is shorter for vaccinated animals. Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible if your pet is bitten by any unfamiliar animal.
  • Any unvaccinated pet that is bitten by a potentially rabid animal must either be euthanized or isolated for at least six months to ensure it does not develop rabies. The required isolation period is shorter for vaccinated animals. Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible if your pet is bitten by any unfamiliar animal.

Can Rabies Be Treated?

  • There is NO effective treatment for rabies. Vaccination is the only way to help prevent infection in animals.
  • Any bite wound from a potentially rabid animal, be it in a person or pet, should be cleaned vigorously right away with large volumes of soap and water for 15 minutes, then disinfected with alcohol or povidone iodine to eliminate as much virus as possible from the wound. If a person is bitten they also need to be given antibodies against the virus right away, and then vaccinated several times. In North America, this requires 5 injections in the upper arm muscle (for adults) over 3 weeks. Previously vaccinated animals need a booster right away.  Any bite wound from a potentially rabid animal, be it in a person or pet, should be cleaned vigorously right away with large volumes of soap and water for 15 minutes, then disinfected with alcohol or povidone iodine to eliminate as much virus as possible from the wound. If a person is bitten they also need to be given antibodies against the virus right away, and then vaccinated several times. In North America, this requires 5 injections in the upper arm muscle (for adults) over 3 weeks. Previously vaccinated animals need a booster right away.

Rabies Vaccines

  • Rabies vaccines are available for dogs, cats and ferrets. These pets should be vaccinated at 3 months of age, boostered one year later, and then annually or every three years, depending on the vaccine used.
  • Even if you have an indoor cat, dog or ferret, vaccination is still very important in case your pet ever escapes, or if a bat ever gets into your house. Vaccination could one day save your pet’s life, and maybe even yours.

What Can I Do To Help Control Rabies?

  • If you have a dog, cat or ferret, make sure its rabies vaccination is always kept up-to-date.
  • Avoid contact with wildlife, especially species that are known to carry rabies, and stray dogs and cats. Always supervise your pet so it does not contact these animals, either.
  • It is very important to teach children never to approach or touch ANY unfamiliar animal, even if it seems friendly, or if it looks sick, injured or unconscious.
  • Avoid all contact with bats whenever possible, particularly bats seen during the day or found on the ground. Keep bats out of buildings. If you find a bat in your house and it may have been there while someone was sleeping (e.g. overnight) or with an infant, contact your public health department as soon as possible and follow their instructions.
  • If you find a sick animal (wild or domestic) or see one that is acting strangely, contact an animal control professional so that it can be captured and tested. Never touch or try to capture the animal yourself. A rabid animal can behave very unpredictably. If you find a sick animal (wild or domestic) or see one that is acting strangely, contact an animal control professional so that it can be captured and tested. Never touch or try to capture the animal yourself. A rabid animal can behave very unpredictably.
  • Do not leave garbage or pet food outside, as it may attract wild animals to your home.

 

In adults, the risk of rabies exposure from pets is LOW in healthy adults, much higher in imnunocompromised adults.  However, post-exposure vaccination may be much less effective in individuals who are imunocompromised (e.g. HIV/AIDS, cancer patients), so they are at slightly increased risk of becoming ill if they are exposed to rabies.

Young children are more likely than adults to try to touch or pick up an unfamiliar animal, and are also more likely to provoke or frighten an animal and thus be bitten. For children, the risk of rabies exposure from pets is likely.

 

Courtesy of wormsandgermsblog.com